Posts Tagged ‘david hughson’

  • Have Mattress Money? Cash-On-Hand Is Now An Eligible Source Of Funds

    Are you stashing money under the mattress, in a home safe, or even in a security deposit box?  And are you a person who customarily uses cash for expenses? If so, there is great news for you when it comes to buying a home.  Through the Fannie Mae HomeReady program cash-on-hand is an acceptable source of funds for a borrower’s down payment, funds for closing costs, and prepaid items like insurance and property taxes.   This means you can use that rainy day fund to buy a home without the illuminati knocking on your door.  Of course, you won’t have any money left over for the apocalypse but if that happens we’ll be back to trading furs and bullets anyway. This could especially be good for those first-time home buyers with minimal funds available for down payment.  Some other great features of this loan program include: Up to 95% financing with non-occupant co-borrower Up to 105% financing w/o non-occupant co-borrower Not required to be a first-time home buyer Gift funds, grants, and down payment assistance programs are all eligible sources of funds. There are even more enhancements to this program that could benefit you so to find out more click here to contact me and reference “Cash-on-hand” in the subject line.   By David Hughson Mortgage Planner david@greenmeansgrow.com 858-863-

  • Have Student Loans? Qualify For A Home Loan And Exclude The Student Loan Payment

    If a monthly student loan payment ( >$0) is provided on the credit report, you may use that amount for qualifying purposes. If the credit report does not provide a monthly payment for the student loan, or if the credit report shows $0 as the monthly payment, the lender must determine the qualifying monthly payment using one of the options below. If the borrower is on an income-driven payment plan, the lender may obtain student loan documentation to verify the actual monthly payment is $0. The lender may then qualify the borrower with a $0 payment. File must contain documentation that the payment is an Income driven payment plan (also known as IBR or Income Based Repayment) For deferred loans or loans in forbearance, the lender may calculate (a) a payment equal to 1% of the outstanding student loan balance (even if this amount is lower than the actual fully amortizing payment), or (b) fully amortizing payment using the documented loan repayment terms. This applies to both purchase and refinance loans so call me to discuss more options on qualifying for a home loan when you have student loans!  For more great content on how your purchase power is affected by student loans click here. By David Hughson Broker | Mortgage Planner 858-863-

  • Mortgages Paid By Others

    Article originally posted on www.mpamag.com Fannie Mae has recently announced the changes related to Mortgages Paid by Others. When a person is obligated on a mortgage debt – but is not the party who is actually repaying the debt – the full monthly housing expense may be excluded from that person’s recurring monthly obligations when they go to buy their next home if: The party making the payments is obligated on the mortgage debt, There are no delinquencies in the most recent 12 months, and The borrower is not using rental income from the applicable property to qualify. In order to exclude the mortgage debt from the borrower’s debt-to-income ratio, the most recent 12 months’ cancelled checks (or bank statements) from the other party making the payments that document a 12 month payment history with no delinquent payments must be obtained. David Hughson Mortgage Broker 858-863-

  • Family Opportunity Mortgage

    Feb 2, 18 • Huggy • Home Buyers, Loan Programs, Purchase LoanNo CommentsRead More »

    Do you have a family member in need and want to help them buy a house?  If you have a disabled adult child or an elderly parent who can’t qualify for a mortgage on their own you have options!  With the Family Opportunity Mortgage, your can purchase another home without the conventional investment property requirements!  Here are some program highlights: Purchase a home for your family member as if you were purchasing an owner occupied home. This allows you to take advantage of the much more lenient owner occupied guidelines and avoid the much more strict investment property guidelines. 620 minimum credit score Can be used for a purchase or refinance   To find out if you qualify click here and type FOM in the subject line.   By David Hughson Mortgage Broker 858-863-

  • Take Cash Out Without The Cash Out Rate Hit

    Dec 18, 17 • Huggy • Loan Programs, Mortgage Rates, RefinancingNo CommentsRead More »

    There are more and more housing reports telling us that most markets around the country have recovered from the last housing crash of 2007-2009. With values back in the black many homeowners will look to cash out their home’s equity to make improvements to their home, pay off other high interest debt, or send a child to college. So what is the best way to harvest a portion of your home’s equity? When looking around for favorable “cash out” refinance loan terms people often discover that banks hit them hard on the interest rate and they end up paying a premium which means the higher loan amount and higher interest rate yields a higher monthly payment.  Now you may be saying that it makes sense they would be facing a higher payment because they are borrowing more money.  In some cases that is true depending on their current interest rate.  You may also be saying that if someone currently has a low interest rate they should leave their existing first mortgage where it is and go get a fixed second mortgage or home equity line for the cash out portion.  This is also true depending on the interest rate they currently have and the value of their home. Often times it’s harder to go get a fixed second mortgage or home equity line behind an existing first mortgage. We now

  • Don’t Fit In The Conventional Lending Box? We Got You Covered

    LendEDU published a financial report back in October of this year showing the national average credit score is 682. This is a solid score in the mortgage lending world but generally considered a “fair” credit score by the credit bureaus. It also means the average American might have a tough time qualifying for a decent mortgage rate. With 50% of people below a 680 credit score it means there are many who don’t qualify for conventional financing and the government loan options, which are typically only for owner occupied homes, can’t help them.  These people typically fall into three categories.  They are someone who has experienced a derogatory credit event like a bankruptcy or foreclosure, a self employed borrower that has too many write offs thereby killing their qualifying income, or they are a real estate investor and/or foreign national unable to purchase their next property due to conventional ownership limits. If you happen to fall into the middle ground between conventional and hard money lending it can feel like you have very few options.  The good news is that there are many new lenders who recognize this need and specialize in helping just this type of borrower through offering Non-Qualified mortgage loans.   To find out more about how this may help you find just the right type of financing for your next purchase click here and send me a message

  • Homebuyers: Get Creative With Your Offers

    Reality check #1:  For most of us the road to home ownership starts with a personal budget and is followed by a conversation about what home loan options are available.  That conversation will determine a buyer’s purchase power which means to look at homes for sale before digging into the numbers is the very definition of putting the cart before the horse. While this advice is nothing new and most people do go about it in the right order what they find when they are ready to start looking at the available inventory is Reality check #2:  There aren’t many homes for sale in their price range and the competition for what is available is fierce. If you are a first-time homebuyer with a low down payment this can seem like a mountain too high to climb and leads many to assume it’s not possible.  The good news is that you are not alone and there are some great strategies that I see working every day to get our clients’ offers accepted. Here are a few of the basics every homebuyer should consider.  Getting your loan pre-approval is very important and a prerequisite at this point.  Meaning, any serious seller will not even consider an offer from a buyer who hasn’t done their due diligence to get their financial ducks in a row.  Buyers can also increase their ernest money

  • Mortgage Rates Return To 2017 Low

    Sep 11, 17 • Huggy • Home Buyers, Mortgage RatesNo CommentsRead More »

    by Francis Monfort | 28 Aug 2017 | Mortgage Professional America  Mortgage rates fell back during the week to their lowest level for the year, Bankrate.com said as it released its weekly national survey. The benchmark 30-year fixed mortgage rate was 4.02%, down from 4.05% last week and tying with the rate last seen June 14, which was the lowest rate since November 2016. The average rate had average discount and origination points of 0.31. The average rate for the larger jumbo 30-year fixed mortgage was 4.03%, while the average 15-year fixed mortgage rate fell to 3.23% from last week’s 3.27% average rate. The latter mortgage type had average points of 0.25. Average rates for adjustable-rate mortgages (ARM) rose this week. The 5-year ARM climbed to 3.50% from 3.49% a week ago and had 0.35 average discount and origination points. The 3-year ARM increased to 3.62% and the 7-year ARM climbed to 3.68%. Bankrate.com said the decrease follows a shift among investors to safe-haven government bonds given high valuations in the stock market. While markets have until recently ignored political and geopolitical issues, they are no longer immune to these developments, the company said. Following recent tensions with North Korea, markets have also been affected by Washington politics and the recent Barcelona terrorist attack. Previously, markets ignored these issues and moved higher given strong corporate earnings, improvements in the economy, and

  • Customer Experience vs. Customer Service In The Mortgage Industry

    Aug 14, 17 • Huggy • Home Buyers, Purchase Loan, RefinancingNo CommentsRead More »
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    by Craig Anderson | 03 Aug 2017 | Customer experience vs. customer service in the mortgage industry Customer experience is a term that shows up everywhere in today’s business marketing.  It’s a “must have,” “the single most important factor” and “if you don’t master it, you’re dead.”  Most experts agree, customer experience is the most important differentiator a company can possess to gain a competitive advantage. But, does anyone really even know the difference between customer experience and customer service?  As long as the customer is happy we should be good, right?  And, don’t most companies have a designated customer service department to handle their customer issues, complaints and general inquiries? Defining the differences Customer service can simply be defined as, “what’s my business doing to help solve my customers’ issues,” while customer experience can be defined as, “how is my customer feeling or what are they thinking every single time they interact with my business?” Now, let’s put these into perspective with the mortgage industry. Rocket Mortgage is often thought to be one of the first in the industry to implement a customer experience program. When they introduced their ‘push button mortgage’ concept, they focused on technology to simplify the mortgage application user experience. Instead of the applicant having to manually type in all of their employment and banking information, the system would retrieve the information and auto-fill the application form

  • Assets Can Be Used For Qualifying Income

    Much of the housing news reported focuses on inventory and credit guidelines.  In case you haven’t noticed housing inventory is low and credit guidelines are tight.  These two headlines show up all the time and for good reason.  In many markets they are both true. With interest rates still low and home prices rising in a majority of markets many homeowners appear to be hanging on to their homes.  This could be to try and time the sale of their home to coincide with a market peak or they realize that if they do sell their home for top dollar they will be turning around to buy in a market with scarce homes available and paying top dollar as well. The gap between income and home affordability can be a hard one to bridge and for many potential home buyers it is out of reach due to increasing prices and a tight credit market. One story I don’t see reported much is that lending volume is down considerably in 2017 and lenders are looking for ways to increase loan applications while not taking on too much risk.  That line is not an easy one to draw so instead of re-writing guidelines or coming up with something altogether new lenders will typically enhance an existing guideline to cast a wider net in an effort to capture more potential borrowers. Whenever

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