Posts Tagged ‘david hughson’

  • Customer Experience vs. Customer Service In The Mortgage Industry

    Aug 14, 17 • Huggy • Home Buyers, Purchase Loan, RefinancingNo CommentsRead More »
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    by Craig Anderson | 03 Aug 2017 | Customer experience vs. customer service in the mortgage industry Customer experience is a term that shows up everywhere in today’s business marketing.  It’s a “must have,” “the single most important factor” and “if you don’t master it, you’re dead.”  Most experts agree, customer experience is the most important differentiator a company can possess to gain a competitive advantage. But, does anyone really even know the difference between customer experience and customer service?  As long as the customer is happy we should be good, right?  And, don’t most companies have a designated customer service department to handle their customer issues, complaints and general inquiries? Defining the differences Customer service can simply be defined as, “what’s my business doing to help solve my customers’ issues,” while customer experience can be defined as, “how is my customer feeling or what are they thinking every single time they interact with my business?” Now, let’s put these into perspective with the mortgage industry. Rocket Mortgage is often thought to be one of the first in the industry to implement a customer experience program. When they introduced their ‘push button mortgage’ concept, they focused on technology to simplify the mortgage application user experience. Instead of the applicant having to manually type in all of their employment and banking information, the system would retrieve the information and auto-fill the application form

  • Assets Can Be Used For Qualifying Income

    Much of the housing news reported focuses on inventory and credit guidelines.  In case you haven’t noticed housing inventory is low and credit guidelines are tight.  These two headlines show up all the time and for good reason.  In many markets they are both true. With interest rates still low and home prices rising in a majority of markets many homeowners appear to be hanging on to their homes.  This could be to try and time the sale of their home to coincide with a market peak or they realize that if they do sell their home for top dollar they will be turning around to buy in a market with scarce homes available and paying top dollar as well. The gap between income and home affordability can be a hard one to bridge and for many potential home buyers it is out of reach due to increasing prices and a tight credit market. One story I don’t see reported much is that lending volume is down considerably in 2017 and lenders are looking for ways to increase loan applications while not taking on too much risk.  That line is not an easy one to draw so instead of re-writing guidelines or coming up with something altogether new lenders will typically enhance an existing guideline to cast a wider net in an effort to capture more potential borrowers. Whenever

  • Is Renting Really Cheaper Than Owning a Home?

    by Anna Sobrevinas | 04 May 2017 | MPA Mortgage Professional America | www.mpamag.com The responsibility of owning a home can be intimidating for people who’ve only rented in the past, but new data from Zillow suggests renting can actually cost more. Zillow’s analysis found out that sans increasing monthly housing costs, a typical renter can buy a home almost 50% more expensive than the median valued home and still get to keep the same amount of monthly housing budget. The median US home value is $196,500, while the median rent in the country is $1,416 per month – an amount enough to pay for monthly housing expenses needed to own a $289,505 home. “The decision between buying and renting is a financial trade-off between saving more each month on a mortgage payment versus spending more on rent but taking advantage of the location and lifestyle amenities urban renting often offers,” said Zillow Chief Economist Dr. Svenja Gudell. “Recent slowdowns in rent growth may take some of the edge off for renters saving to become homeowners. This is good news, since saving a down payment, qualifying for a loan and finding a home available at a manageable price remain hurdles for millions of aspiring buyers.” Renters in Cleveland can afford a $174,194 home while retaining monthly housing costs, which is representative of more than 80% of homes on the market now,

  • Have Student Loans? The Rules Have Changed

    I may have just missed the student loan debt explosion when I graduated with my undergrad degree in 1998.  While college was expensive to attend twenty years ago, we were all borrowing money to get an education, it was nothing compared to the amounts borrowed during the college financing boom of the last fifteen years. Nowadays young people are in record amounts of debt the moment they are handed a diploma which means starting off their earliest earning years with essentially a thirty year mortgage to pay back.  College ain’t what it used to be and many times all this borrowed money is for a degree that yields earning power guaranteed to tie up their income for the better part of their career. The student loan income-based repayment plans have been a help to many people.  These plans allow monthly payments to be calculated based upon a person’s income which give people a fighting chance to start paying back their loans and be able to eat as well.   This is a big deal for those just starting out but there are at least two challenges tied to this calculation.   First, the debt will take that much longer to pay off and second when you go to apply for a mortgage the bank approving your application will hit the person for up to 1% of the balance of the

  • 40-Year Fixed & Interest Only

    Yes, you read that right.  We have loan terms fixed for 40 years and the first 10 years can be interest only.  And here is best part:  The range of loan amount is $100k to $2.5 million. While our residential lending world looks to find it’s footing in this new market place lending volume is down and banks are looking to expand lending guidelines to appeal to a wider variety of consumer.  For those of you who recall what the lending world looked like ten years ago this may feel nostalgic and for those of you new to the home buyer market this may be your big opportunity. As with every loan program the devil is in the details and I think this is where this program shines because the barrier to entry is very reasonable.  For example, do you have a bankruptcy on your record?  It it’s been 2 years since the discharge date you are eligible for this loan.  Do you have a 600+ Fico score?  You are eligible.  Even the reserve requirement and debt-to-income ratio are better than most lending programs out there and they even allow non-occupant co-borrowers.     Basically, the only thing keeping you from qualifying for this loan is not taking action.  Want to spend a few minutes of your time finding out what your purchase power looks like using this incredible opportunity

  • Expect Mortgage Rates To Keep Rising This Year, Says Freddie

    Mar 24, 17 • Huggy • How To Buy A Home, Mortgage RatesNo CommentsRead More »

    by Ryan Smith | 17 Mar 2017 Mortgage Professional America | www.mpamag.com Mortgage rates were up for the second consecutive week this week – and originators should expect that upward trajectory to continue as the Fed keeps raising the benchmark rate, according to Freddie Mac. The Federal Reserve fulfilled market expectations by raising the federal funds rate by a quarter of a percent this week – only the third time in a decade the rate has been raised. However, Fed officials had signaled their intentions leading up to the agency’s meeting this week – so clearly, in fact, that market expectations of a March rate hike shot from only around 30% to 80% in advance of the meeting. Those expectations drove mortgage rates up even before the Fed made its benchmark rate hike official, according to Sean Becketti, chief economist for Freddie Mac. “As expected, the FOMC announced its first rate hike of 2017 and hinted at additional increases throughout the remainder of the year,” Becketti said. “Although our survey was conducted prior to the Fed’s decision, the release of the February jobs report all but guaranteed a rate hike and boosted the 30-year mortgage rate nine basis points to 4.30% this week.” The 15-year fixed-rate mortgage also rose this week, with its average rate spiking to 3.50% from last week’s 3.42%. And the 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage rose from 3.23%

  • Do You Qualify For A Down Payment Program? Here’s How To Find Out

    Do You Qualify For A Down Payment Program? Here’s How To Find Out

    Source:  Down Payment Resource Did you know the average down payment assistance benefit is more than $8,000? That could be a major jump start to buying your first (or next!) home. And, who wouldn’t want a boost to their down payment savings? Homeownership programs can help you get in a house much more quickly and give you a valuable cash cushion for those other expenses, like the home inspection and home repairs. You could save on save on your down payment and closing costs, or even get ongoing tax credits. But, who qualifies for down payment assistance? First, it’s important to know that there are actually two components—both you and the the home you are buying must meet certain criteria, which vary by program. Our Down Payment Resource program search gives you the opportunity to answer a few simple questions to determine if you (and the home you want to buy) may meet the basic qualifications for a program. What are the criteria for the buyer? Family finances matter. There are household income thresholds, credit score minimums and cash reserve requirements. Income thresholds are based on the area median income—up to 120 percent in high cost markets. Income limits are almost always based on household size, so limits for a family of five are significantly higher than for a single person. Most programs will require some money down from the homebuyer, as well as homebuyer

  • What Happens To Home Buying Power As Rates Rise?

    By Eric J Martin of The Mortgage Reports Originally posted on November 21, 2016   Mortgage Rates’ Profound Effect On Affordability The mortgage interest rate you find plays a large part in how much money your lender will let you borrow. That affects how much home you can buy. That begs the question: how does your purchasing power change if rates creep up a half a point or even one full percentage point? Much more than you might think, which is why it pays to shop for a home now, and lock in a favorable fixed rate at historical lows. Many home buyers realize that rising home prices can limit their ability to buy. However, rising interest rates can alter home-buying plans even more. The current rate environment is likely a narrow window of opportunity in which to claim a low rate and a still-reasonable home price. Housing agency Freddie Mac recently predicted that mortgage rates will rise to 4.0% in 2017. That’s more than 50 basis points (0.50%) higher than the current mortgage rate average. Today’s rates maximize your ability to buy a better home with affordable payments. Click to see today’s rates (Feb 13th, 2017) The Cost Of Rising Rates Today’s lenders qualify home buyers based on several factors, not the least of which is something called a debt-to-income ratio (DTI). A low DTI demonstrates that you have a healthy balance between income and debt. Lenders generally cap the allowable DTI at

  • Mortgage Credit Certificates = More Money In Your Pocket

    Blog Source: Down Payment Resource – downpaymentresource.com – February 2, 2017 While the total number of programs remained consistent, the HPI saw an increase in Mortgage Credit Certificates (MCCs) across the country, representing more than 8 percent of all programs. Between 2010 and 2015, state housing finance agencies increased MCC issuances to homebuyers by more than 400 percent, according to preliminary data from National Council of State Housing Agencies (NCSHA). The MCC is a tax credit program that allows eligible homebuyers to claim a percentage of the mortgage interest they paid as a tax credit on their federal income tax return. The percentage of mortgage credit allowed varies depending on the state or local housing agency that issues the certificates, but the credit itself is capped at a maximum of $2,000 per year by the IRS. The buyer may continue to receive an annual tax credit for as long as they live in the home and retain the original mortgage. “The mortgage interest rate tax deduction has long been a core homebuyer benefit, but most homebuyers are unaware of Mortgage Credit Certificates. This credit directly impacts a homebuyer’s bottom line by reducing their annual tax bill,” said Chrane. “We see more lenders adding MCCs to their product offerings.” Qualifying homebuyers are permitted to use an MCC alongside another type of down payment assistance program, such as a grant or forgivable

  • Why It Takes Years To Save For A Down Payment

    By Kathryn Vasel of CNN Money Saving for a down payment is often a major hurdle for wanna-be homeowners. And for good reason: Putting 20% down costs two-thirds of the average household income, according to a new report from Zillow. “It’s a big number,” said Aaron Terrazas, senior economist at Zillow. “Very few are saving for a down payment in one year, it’s something they do over multiple years. And for renters who have been faced with rising rent and health care costs, it’s very difficult to put away any money at all.” A median-priced home in the U.S. is $192,500, according to the report, which means buyers need to come up with $38,500 to put 20% down. And that figure doesn’t include added expenses associated with home buying — like an inspection and closing and moving costs. Home prices have been rising throughout the country, largely because of strong demand for homes combined with a shortage of available homes for sale. In many markets, home prices rose much faster than incomes, putting homeownership out of reach for some buyers. Calculate: How much house can you afford? Home buyers in California, where home prices have exploded in the past few years, are feeling the pinch the most. For house hunters in San Jose, San Francisco and Los Angeles, saving a year’s worth of income wouldn’t cover a 20% down payment

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